60
      Saturday
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      Sunday
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      Monday
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      BGSU faculty to lose their jobs

      The student union was packed with BGSU faculty on Friday afternoon. They were there to oppose staffing decisions being made by the university.

      "Cuts to 40, full-time faculty at BGSU. Cuts that we believe will be devastating to the quality of the BGSU education," says faculty association president David Jackson.

      The cuts are actually not cuts, but rather contractual positions that are not being renewed in May 2014.

      "Basically the university is trying to cover their butts, because they don't want it to seem like a cut," says journalism instructor Dave Sennerud.

      Sennerud is just one instructor who's contract is not being renewed.

      He says, "I got a letter. I just got a letter telling me that I would not be renewed."

      The administration says the reduction in staff is necessary to keep the student cost down.

      "We want to make sure we balance our enrollment with our faculty size. At the end of the day, students across the nation are struggling with keeping education affordable," says BGSU Senior VP of Academic Affairs Rodney Rogers.

      Those opposed to the reduction, say the university has plenty of money to keep the current staff.

      "The university has over $150 million in unrestricted net assets," says Jackson.

      Jackson says he and other instructors think that any reduction would mean larger class sizes, and fewer options for students.

      Jackson adds, "Universities who try to cut their way to prosperity fail."

      The university says it's hard to send out non-renewal letters.

      "It is always a difficult decision when it impacts individuals lives," says Rogers.

      But as far as Dave Sennerud is concerned, university officials are cutting in the wrong area.

      Sennerud says, "I make less than president (Mary Ellen) Mazey made in her bonus this year. There are questionable priorities at this school."

      The university recently hired a consulting firm to audit their operations. That cost the school $500 thousand.

      Instructors say they have already been dealing with staffing changes.

      In august, the university lost 72 faculty members due to non-renewals, as well as voluntary departures.