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      Cancer patients find renewed beauty, confidence

      The American Cancer Society offers dozens of programs to folks battling cancer.

      One of the most popular among women is "Look Good... Feel Better": a seminar on how to use make up, wigs and scarves to help combat the toll cancer and cancer treatment can take on the appearance.

      Bonnie Diller helps women battling cancer feel beautiful.

      "I've always loved playing around with make up, so when I heard about it, I went to go check it out. I went to the program and I signed up and I've been doing it for 10 years now," said Diller.

      As a licensed cosmetologist she puts her skills to good use and says being involved in the program makes her feel good by helping others feel better.

      "We have women who come in and they're very sad or they come in and they seem pretty happy. And some come in very scared. But all people leave just happy," said Diller.

      Erin Jones decided to attend a session after undergoing treatment for breast cancer.

      "I had a mastectomy. And so you lose part of yourself that defines you, or you think defines you, as a woman. And then you lose your hair, which includes your eyebrows, and you just sort of feel a little androgynous and maybe you want something to get back to that feminine side. So it's nice to have the make up," said Jones.

      As part of the session participants get to take home a gift bag of hundreds of dollars of product provided free-of-charge by the Personal Care Products Council Foundation, the Professional Beauty Association and the National Cosmetology Association.

      "I've never been a make up maven, I've always been a tomboy girl but I really like the free," said Jones. "It was fun and I still use some of the techniques today and I have a lot of fun using it."

      For women overwhelmed with surgeries, treatments, medications and doctors visits the few hours in the "Look Good... Feel Better" session is a break from thinking about their disease and making the most of what they do have.

      "It gives you hope," said Jones. "And really makes you look for the next day. It was very inspiring. I'm very glad I did it and I can't recommend it anymore highly than that."