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      Findlay residents used to flooding

      Findlay, OH - The saying goes, "April showers bring May flowers." But if you live in Findlay, Ohio, April showers bring April floods.

      It looks like typical ponds or lakes in some Findlay neighborhoods, but in fact, it's someone's back yard covered in feet of water.

      It's a sight locals have grown accustomed to, say home owner Becky Dawson, "Every time it rains hard, it floods."

      The park next to Becky Dawson's house is completely under water. She says they are so used toi the flooding, they refer to the park as Dawson's Creek.

      The water didn't reach her house this time, but she recalls the chaos caused by a flood in 2007, whenshe had to be transported from her front door by jet ski.

      "All the logs down there now from the park, floated right up the street. [There were] life boats and everything," she remembers.

      One resident, who immigrated from Turkey, had never seen anything like it before.

      "Flooding, flooding. I didn't know what that means, flooding. And then I learned about flooding," the man says.

      Other residents say that every time they get a hard rain, they're on constant lookout.

      "Checking, coming over every hour, checking," says one man.

      Becky admits, "My husband and I didn't realize it. We were taking turns getting up with the flashlight looking out the window and seeing what's going on."

      The area floods because excess water that poses a flood risk to downtown Findlay is diverted from the Blanchard River a few mile away, and over to this neighborhood creek, which some residents are upset by.

      "The local and the state should do something because it's [costing] land value, and public safety," says Becky Dawson.

      Most residents agree that a dike or runoff canal would do the trick to prevent flooding, but right now there are no plans for such a project. However, research is being conducted by the Army Corp of Engineers to try to find a possible solution.

      Residents in the flood area all say the same thing when it rains. They watch the weather forecast and cross their fingers that the rain will not dump too much.