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Former ProMedica therapist convicted of illegally obtaining patient data

A former ProMedica respiratory therapist has been convicted in federal court of illegally obtaining health information while employed at Bay Park Hospital. (WNWO)

TOLEDO, Oh. (WNWO) -- A former ProMedica respiratory therapist has been convicted in federal court of illegally obtaining health information while employed at Bay Park Hospital.

A trial began against Jamie Knapp, 27, began on Monday in U.S. District Court in Toledo. The former ProMedica employee was tried on charges of obtaining individually identifiable health information and unauthorized access of a protected computer.

The former therapist accessed a patient's health information on a hospital computer between the dates of May 10, 2013 to March 25, 2014. The protected computer contained electronic health records of approximately 596 patients at Bay Park Hospital.

On Friday, the Department of Justice issued a statement confirming Knapp's conviction following the two-and-half-day jury trial.

Evidence and testimony during the trial showed that Knapp accessed the medical files for the nearly 600 patients who were not receiving any form of respiratory treatment. Evidence showed that Knapp arrived at the hospital three hours before her shift on April 1, 2014. She then accessed patient files for four non-respiratory patients within a span of two minutes. She then went to one of the patients rooms to remove a sharps disposal container. When hospital staff located the sharps container it was broken open with empty vials of medication on the lip of the container. When Knapp returned to the hospital for her scheduled shift, she had unsterile, large-gauge needles, syringes, and a tourniquet, in her pocket. Her access of patient files was discovered during a hospital review of her computer access.

Knapp faces up to one year in prison and up to $50,000 in fines when sentenced. That sentencing date has not been set.

In June 2014, Oregon Police chose not to file charges against Knapp after an investigation showed no patient information, such as social security numbers or financial information, had been compromised. Evidence was insufficient to bring charges against Knapp. "The fact of the matter is we couldn't prove our theory," Oregon Police Chief Mike Navarre said in June 2014.

The conviction resulted from an investigation conducted by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

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