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      Michigan House votes to put EpiPens in schools

      <span id="bIImageViewer_CaptionTextID">Only 27 states require or allow epinephrine, a drug used to treat anaphylactic shock, to be available in schools.</span>

      Every public school in Michigan would have to have special injectors to treat allergic reactions under legislation that has passed the state House.

      Legislators voted 96-10 on Wednesday for a bill requiring schools by next year to have epinephrine devices, or EpiPens. The measure and another bill now head to the Senate.

      Many children with severe allergies already bring EpiPens to school. Supporters of the legislation say a quarter of anaphylactic shock incidents in schools occur among students unaware that they have an allergy.

      Without a dose of epinephrine to stop reactions to peanuts or bee stings, kids can die.

      Schools could qualify for free EpiPens through a program offered a pharmaceutical company. But the bill says if that's unavailable, school boards can get funding from the state.