55
      Friday
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      Saturday
      80 / 65
      Sunday
      82 / 63

      Toledo pumps more money, chemicals into treating water

      <font size="2">With many residents still leery of Toledo's drinking water, the city says it will spend nearly $5 million this year to make sure it is safe.</font>

      TOLEDO -- With many residents still leery of Toledo's drinking water, the city says it will spend nearly $5 million this year to make sure it is safe.

      City officials say they will spend about $4.7 million this year, $1.7 million more than their annual expense, on chemicals to treat water.

      The increase in spending comes after the city's 50+ hour water consumption ban in early August. Toledo issued a "do not drink" advisory on Satuday, August 2 after the city's water supply was found to be contaminated with microcystin, a harmful toxin resulting from algal blooms in Lake Erie. The water ban was lifted on the morning of August 4.

      COMPLETE COVERAGE: Toledo Water Crisis

      The ban was put in place after a test of the city's treated water revealed a level of microcystin above 1.0. The World Health Organization recommends not to drink water when microcystin reaches a level of 1.0. The Ohio EPA must be notified of any reading over .5.

      Since the crisis, the city's use of chemicals to treat the water has seemed to work, for the most part. According to water test results posted to the city's website, microcystin toxin has been undetectable in the city's water supply since August 19.

      A 0.972 level was detected on the city's treated water on August 15.

      Toledo has historically drawn its water from the lake and for the last several years has been forced to spend millions of dollars to get rid of toxins in the water.

      Toledo officials say the two-day water warning in early August also cost the city more than $200,000 in overtime.

      On Thursday, the city detailed a more than $263 mililon project to improve the city's more than 70-years old Collins Park Water Treatment Plant. Officials said five years of work could sustain the plant for another 70 years. Changes include two additional basins and improvements to the filter system.

      (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)