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      Hey ladies! Augusta National Golf Club admits first two female members

      After years of protests, negative publicity and the threat of legal action, August National Golf Club, home of the Master's, has finally admitted two female members.

      And you just might recognize one of them.

      CNN reports that the decision to admit former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and business executive Darla Moore of Lake City, South Carolina, ends a longstanding policy excluding women as members of the exclusive Georgia club.

      Augusta's membership, which includes some of the biggest names in business, has been male-only since its opening in 1932.

      The "men only" policy had been upheld as recent as April when Billy Payne, chairman of Augusta National Golf Club and the Masters Tournament, said the issue was a private matter.

      "This is a joyous occasion as we enthusiastically welcome Secretary Condoleezza Rice and Darla Moore as members of Augusta National Golf Club," Payne said in a statement Monday.

      "We are fortunate to consider many qualified candidates for membership at Augusta National. Consideration with regard to any candidate is deliberate, held in strict confidence and always takes place over an extended period of time. The process for Condoleezza and Darla was no different."

      Rice said in a statement of her own, "I have long admired the important role Augusta National has played in the traditions and history of golf."

      "I also have an immense respect for the Masters tournament and its commitment to grow the game of golf, particularly with youth, here in the United States and throughout the world." she added.

      Darla Moore is the vice president of Rainwater Inc., the investment firm founded by her husband, Richard Rainwater. According to CNN, Fortune magazine once named her among the top 50 women in business, and the University of South Carolina's business school is named in her honor.

      Should Augusta have allowed women into the club? Or should they have stood their ground? Change of heart...or cave to pressure?