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Young voters react to Ohio's primary election

The impact of younger voters in this year's presidential election has been at the forefront. (MGN Online)

The impact of younger voters in this year's presidential election has been at the forefront-especially after a group of Ohio teens took their right to vote in the Presidential Primaries to a judge. The judge ruled 17-year-olds are legally able to cast a ballot.

"Decisions and politics are going to affect their lives and they need to be informed with who and what is on the ballot," said Austin Serna, the Sylvania Township Precint Chair for Lucas County.

Serna said as long as a 17-year-old would be 18 by the general election, and had registered to vote by the deadline-they can vote.

"It is very critical-especially a lot of young people have opinions-they want their voice to be heard and tomorrow is a perfect day to do that," Serna said.

Serna has a unique perspective as the youngest precinct chair for Lucas County. He was appointed two years ago at the age of 19. He's running unopposed to keep that position. Serna wants to encourage others- especially younger voters- to let their voices be heard.

"The Baby Boomer generation as they're getting ready to retire as they're getting ready to leave congress, it's up to us now. about where the state, where the country is moving."

"Personally I don't think I am ready yet. I mean I'm still in school now. I don't really know," Dante Abraham, a Start High School student said.

His classmate, Megan Losh, does feel ready.

"If I can vote in the general election, I think I have the right to be able to narrow it down to who I'm voting for in the general election. I think that's my right as a citizen and as a soon-to-be 18 year old," she said.

"Even at our age, we can form our own opinion-we can see-it is our country- we're going to be living in it. So why don't we have a say in what we want to change?" Kali Urbina, said. She will be 18 by general election.

According to a study by the U.S. elections project, 2014 saw the lowest number of voters age 18 to 29.

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